News Spotlight: Exercise is Cool, Despite the Heat according to the American Heart Assoc
Thursday, July 21, 2011

 

Whatever brings you outside — a bike ride with friends, a jog in the park or just a stroll around the block — it’s important to stay safe as temperatures across Michigan rise this week.  But don’t let this be the excuse to take a break from fitness, because you may be hurting yourself in the long run.
 
 “It’s important to continue exercising over the summer because the effects of exercise training are rapidly lost once training stops — use it or lose it,” said Barry Franklin, Ph.D., director of the William Beaumont Hospital Cardiac Rehab and Exercise Laboratories in Royal Oak, Mich. “Most studies suggest many of the key benefits are lost in four to six weeks of inactivity.”
 
Be smarter than the heat
 
Still, you can’t just ignore the heat because you could wind up with heat stress, heat stroke or other problems. So to keep the heat from melting your workouts, Franklin recommends you:
Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. Maintain salt-water balance by drinking plenty of fluids (preferably water) before, during and after physical activity.  Avoid alcoholic and caffeinated beverages.
Exercise smarter, not harder. Work out during the cooler parts of the day, preferably when the sun's radiation is minimal — early in the morning or early in the evening. Decrease exercise intensity and duration at high temperatures or relative humidity.  And don’t hesitate to take your exercise inside, to the gym, the mall or anyplace else where you can get in regular physical activity. 
Ease in to summer. Allow your body to adapt partially to heat through repeated gradual daily exposures. “An increase in the body's circulatory and cooling efficiency, called acclimatization, generally occurs in only four to 14 days,” Franklin said. \
Dress the part. Wear minimal amounts of clothing to facilitate cooling by evaporation. “Remember, it’s not sweating that cools the body; rather, the evaporation of sweat into the atmosphere,” Franklin said. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing in breathable fabrics such as cotton. 
Team up.  If you can, exercise with a friend or family member. It’s safer, and could be more fun.
 
Know what’s up
 
Because vigorous exercise in hot and humid conditions can lead to heat stress, heat stroke and related complications, you should know the signs of danger to keep an eye out for.
Symptoms of heat exhaustion:
Headaches
Heavy sweating
Cold, moist skin, chills
Dizziness or fainting
Weak or rapid pulse
Muscle cramps
Fast, shallow breathing
Nausea, vomiting or both
Symptoms of heat stroke:
Warm, dry skin with no sweating
Strong and rapid pulse
Confusion and/or unconsciousness
High fever
Throbbing headaches
Nausea, vomiting or both
Take steps to cool down and get medical attention immediately if you experience any of these symptoms.
Source: Americanheart.org
 
 
 

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